An official account of all species that have been recorded and reported by birdwatchers and naturalists since records began.

The data for this list has been extracted from various sources, but George Greens 'The Birds of Dorset', Mansel-Pleydell's Birds of Dorsetshire, Naylor’s reference manual of rare birds and the back catalogue of Dorset bird reports have provided most information. Data is currently still being researched and records will be updated accordingly.

You can view this information in two different ways. Our alphabetical list provides information on the status of each species within the harbour, finder dates and names, photos and favored locations. By clicking on the Systematic List button you will be presented the full Poole Harbour systematic list which includes status of species, pending records and historical accounts.

To date, 331 species have occurred and have been accepted within the Birds of Poole Harbour boundaries. A further 11 distinct subspecies have also been seen. In addition, we have two species/subspecies which have been recorded, but are awaiting acceptance by the appropriate records panel.

There are a handful of historical records, for which there is currently insufficient information to allow their inclusion onto the Poole Harbour list, but are believed to be genuine records. They are listed at the end of the list.

Finally, there are a number of feral or escaped species that have been recorded within the Birds of Poole Harbour boundaries. They are included for completeness, but are not included on the Poole Harbour list.

We would be interested in hearing details of any species that do not appeared on this list.

The Birds of Poole Harbour systematic list is a PDF which you can view by clicking on the button below. It was last updated on December 2019.

Full Poole Harbour Systematic List
 

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All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

Common Nighthawk

Latin Name

Chordeiles minor

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

Likely to never occur again, or certainly not any time soon this amazing record still fills many local birders with envy.

1 at 11 a.m. on 23rd Oct 1983 at Studland Village (M.Massey, K.Massey, M.Howard). BB mistakenly published the date as the 25th Oct.


Common Rosefinch

Latin Name

Carpodacus erythrinus

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

A remarkable first Poole Harbour record, feeding in an urban garden on sunflower hearts and mixed seed. Surely some more records will follow this one, albeit in a perhaps more traditional habitat and location.

1 from 28th Jan to at least 10th Apr 2013 in a Broadstone garden (E. Brodie et al). A remarkable first Poole Harbour record, feeding in an urban garden on sunflower hearts and mixed seed.


Common Sandpiper

Latin Name

Actitis hypoleucos

Status

Passage Migrant & Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

Birds pass through the harbour in spring and autumn. Autumn passage actually begins during mid summer with the Brownsea lagoon, Lytchett Fields, Holton Pools and Holes Bay being hotspots, it’s also at this time that the maximum site count of 27 was at Studland on 29th July 1988 and the harbour maximum of 47 was in August 1990. Birds can be found at any quiet tidal bay or creek but Lytchett Bay, Brands Bay, Middlebere and Swineham all host birds.


Common Scoter

Latin Name

Melanitta nigra

Status

Passage Migrant & Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

Pre 1960 large flocks of Common Scoter used to gather in Poole Bay and included 100+ in 1958. A J Bull wrote in the 1958 Bird Report that there were “large gatherings on a scale not recently recorded in Poole Bay with up to 1000 on March 20th. All gone by the next day.” Unsurprisingly this is the maximum count for the harbour. In the late 1990’s around 20 birds was a more typical count. Otherwise odd birds were found in the Balls Lake area of the harbour, in Brands Bay and off Ham Park.

More recently Common Scoter numbers have stayed pretty stable with between 3-10 present each year and the last 5-year average being five per winter. Common Scoter are best looked for off Knoll and Middle Beach, Studland or in the south east corner of the harbour at sites like Brands Bay, Goathorn or central harbour.

Passage birds are noted annually past Branksome and Old Harry and on good days can reach double figures.

Most recently (and amazingly), it’s been discovered that there’s an annual night migration of Common Scoter  in the early spring and late Autumn. On a calm night in late March or early April passings of Common Scoter have been sound recorded and seen with thermal imaging equipment tracking north over the harbour and heading in land, allowing keen birders the opportunity to ‘tick’ Common Scoter on their garden lists by listening carefully. Extraordinary!

 


Common Shelduck

Latin Name

Tadorna tadorna

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

Shelduck were ‘so disgracefully common‘ that in the 1930’s the harbour was being described as Shelduck headquarters and since more of the land was being managed for wildlife it attracted even more from other wetlands in the south of England. This has given Poole internationally important status for wintering numbers of this species.

Various estimates have been attempted for the full harbour breeding population . In the 70’s Prendergast and Boyes estimated between 50 – 70 pairs and in 1975 Collins came to the same conclusion. The peak summer number for adults in summer was 274 on 10th July 1994 and they have bred on Brownsea (up to thirty pairs 2004), Arne (up to 30 pairs), Lytchett Bay, Hatch Pond, Canford Heath, Green Island, Brands Bay, Upton Country Park, Goathorn and Newtons Bay, Fitzworth and Studland (up to 50 pairs throughout the area). The amounts in brackets were estimates made by full time wardens of the three main reserves.

Once breeding is over in July local crèches build up and the balance of adults leave the harbour for communal moult in the German Waddensea. In June and July its worth looking out for crèches of around 25 different aged young with 2 adults. In the survey in 10th July 1994 five crèches containing 169 juveniles were found. The record number of juveniles was 197 in July 1992. Among other environmental pressures, it’s possible that the increase in recreational disturbance in the breeding season could be affecting their numbers. In October the adults return probably accompanied by birds from Scandinavia and the Baltic making up a regular aspect of a sea watch from Branksome and numbers in the harbour start to build. The maximum count of 4650 in January 1997 came after easterlies and north-easterlies froze the harbour for a week and included 1230 at Keysworth.

Alan Bromby in Birds of Dorset points out that “The Poole gunners had local names for most species of wildfowl which have now largely died out. Shelduck were known as “Burrow Ducks”, Pochards as “Redheads” and Tufted Ducks as “Curre” whilst the term “Ginger Curre” was reserved for Goldeneye”. Notorious ex RSPB Arne warden Bryan Pickess in his days wardening at Arne would only ever guarantee Shelduck and Meadow Pipit on any guided walk on the reserve!

“The worrying decline in Poole Harbours wintering population continued with a maximum of only 1,754 in 2000/2001. Winter maxima throughout the 1990’s were over 2000 birds, but recent winter counts show maximums of just 976 in February 2020.

Despite their decline, they’re one of the easiest birds to find on the southern sides of the harbour, and is evident in most areas with exposed mud on the low tide.


Common Tern

Latin Name

Sterna hirundo

Status

Summer Visitor & Passage Migrant

Site And Records Information

Brownsea is the only breeding site in the harbour for Common Tern. They outnumber the Sandwich Tern but both can be seen heading out of the harbour mouth to feed amongst the swimmers and yacht’s. Common Terns first bred in the harbour in 1951 and immediately populated the Dorset National Trusts tern islands when they were built in 1963. Eight pairs bred then and this built to 90 pairs in 1970. Numbers continued to rise and in 1990 when the Brownsea breeding colony reached 130 pairs and was classified of National importance. In 1997 pairs on nests reached 173 but heavy rain caused damage. In 2012 pairs bred, but only 1 chick fledged! There was a remarkable ringing recovery in 2000 involving a bird ringed at Brownsea in 1999 and found in Cape Province, South Africa after being hit by a train along with 45 other terns.


Continental Cormorant

Latin Name

Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis

Status

Passage Migrant & Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

Sinensis’ (continental) Cormorant are known to be more migratory than ‘carbo’ with juveniles dispersing long distances within two months of fledging in June, and what appear to be juvenile sinensis are in large numbers on Brownsea in August and September.

Sinensis are known to be more migratory than carbo Cormorants with juveniles dispersing long distances within two months of fledging in June, and what appear to be juvenile sinensis are in large numbers on Brownsea in August and September. Maybe significant numbers of European migrants of this taxa are mixing with the dispersing carbo’s from the west of England, Wales and Ireland as they move to the east of England and this creates a peak. The identification of some birds is still very difficult and is not helped by this species habit of never sitting still and allowing careful study of the shape of the gular area. Using the gular patch alone is thought to enable eighty percent of sinensis to be identified. Whether sinensis breed in the area is not known, but birds breeding inland should be checked as they are most likely to be this type.


Continental Lesser Black-backed Gull

Latin Name

Larus fuscus intermedius

Status

Scarce Passage Migrant


Coot

Latin Name

Fulica atra

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

Coot breed at certain sites like Hatch Pond, Little Sea, Poole Park, Hatch Pond and Swineham. Numbers can swell during the winter with many birds at Poole Park, but can remain very scarce in certain areas throughout the harbour. There was a 650+ in Poole Harbour during the cold spell Feb 1963 and the average 5 year peak between 2014 and 2019 is 222.

It’s also recently been discovered that just like Water Rail and Moorhen, Coot are very active at night, calling frequently above the harbour as they transit or migrate across from one site to another, or arrive from areas much further afield. They may also do these regular night flights to simply to defend a territory too. Coot can be extremely rare in some areas of Poole Harbour, take Lytchett Bay for example where there have been less than 5 visual records in the last 5 years (2015-2020), however, stick a microphone out at night and you can record Coot calling directly over the microphone every single night!

 


Cormorant

Latin Name

Phalacrocorax carbo

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

Poole Harbour is nationally important passage and wintering area for ‘carbo’ Cormorant with over 3% of the British population. Breeding takes place on the cliffs of Ballard Down with a historical maximum count of 172 nests, but only 86 nests were counted in 1999 and 57 in 2003. It’s thought now that breeding totals are now in the low double figures. This species is common at many sites around the harbour later in the year but numbers increase in autumn and winter where they’ll occasionally join the large rafts of up to 700 ‘sinensis‘ Cormorants that feed in the deep channels off Shipstal, Brownsea and the Wareham Channel. Continental ‘Sinensis‘ Cormorants are known to be more migratory than ‘carbo’ with juveniles dispersing long distances within two months of fledging in June, and what appear to be juvenile sinensis are in large numbers on Brownsea in August and September. Large rafts of up to 700 sinensis Cormorant can occur by late October, feeding as one unit out in the centre of the harbour.

In 1966 John Ash recorded that on “13th February, three of the southern race flew out with 80 of the usual race.” While this is the first documented record for the harbour, Britain’s first record was in Christchurch in 1873, so it had probably been sneaking round well before that. Now Cormorants of this continental race sinensis seem to have increased in the harbour over the last 30 years mirroring a similar increase across the whole of eastern and southern England. Spring adults are conspicuous and can be seen in the Wareham channel or on the Brownsea Lagoon.


Corn Bunting

Status

Former Resident, now Rare Visitor

Site And Records Information

The 1968-72 Atlas found that the species was widely distributed across Dorset including parts of Poole Harbour. In Jan 1963 up to 17 were attracted to corn put out for waterfowl at One Acre Pool, Studland. This was during the prolonged freeze in that famous winter. A significant decline began in the 1970’s and continued until the mid-90’s. Looks like the best hope now is a fly-over during a visible-migration watch or there just may be one in a winter finch and bunting flock?


Corncrake

Latin Name

Crex crex

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

Like the rest of the country, Corncrake was at one time a common summer resident but started to disappear around 1900. By 1950 it had virtually ceased to breed in Dorset. Since then only migrants have been found. There are 9 records since 1958 but none for 19 years. Most ‘recently’…..

1 an immature male (“sexed by dissection”) being found dead by Mike Tuck outside Studland P.O. on 8th September 1966.
1, possibly 2, on 16th Apr 1970 calling at Fitzworth Creek, Corfe River.
1 male found dead on 10th Sep 1970 at Studland
1 on 25th Sep 1996 at Lytchett Bay was seen in flight as it was flushed from rank grass (S.Robson)

 

 


Crane

Latin Name

Grus grus

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

With populations increasing in eastern and central-southern England it’s no surprise we’re seeing more records of Common Crane in the harbour in recent years. A lovely early account came from Studland whilst showing the Weymouth Grammar School YOC group round Brands Bay on 2nd December 1978 one of the pupils asked Studland warden Rees Cox the identity of six Cranes that flew into Greenlands Farm and alighted in the fields. According to Rees, the birds “alighted and fed in the fields by Brands Bay.”

1 on 16th Aug 1975 at Lytchett Bay
6 on 2nd Dec 1978 at Brands Bay
1 19th & 22nd Sep and 3rd & 10th Oct 1999 at Lytchett Bay (S.Robson et al)
1 on 13th Oct 2004 on the Brownsea Lagoon (many observers)
3 on 11th Apr 2014 over Stoborough (N.Hopper)
2 on 5th March 2016 over Holton Lee and Lytchett Bay (P.Morton)
1 on 3rd June 2016 over A35 (Poole Harbour boundary), Lytchett Minster (P.Morton)
4 on 8th November over the Ower at the Rempstone Estate, later seen over the Fleet at Portland.
1 on 10th April 2018 over Upton Heath (H.Murray)
2 over Poole Harbour Mouth on Sept 24th 2018 (C.Wilcox) and the following day found feeding at a private site in the harbour (B.Maxted). They were then heard calling at dawn near RSPB Arne on Sept 26th 2018. They were then later seen feeding on private farmland on the Rempstone Estate later that day.
1 present/roosting in the Hartland Moor/Middlebere area from 15th – 18th Jan 2019
1 over Middlebere 27th Jan 2019 (F.Keeling)
1 over Ridge, Wareham on 2nd March 2020 (B.Ford)

There are various outstanding reports of between 1 and 4 Cranes at Holes Bay and/or Arne in Jan and/or Oct 2012. We would be pleased to receive any further details on these reports.


Crossbill

Latin Name

Loxia curvirostra

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

Numbers of Crossbill around Poole Harbour are very much dependent on invasions. The actual underlying population which is centred around Rempstone heath is quite low, however irruptions are frequent and in those years they can be very common. In addition birds can also stay in the area for several years sometimes until the next invasion. Arne frequently hosts Crossbill in and around it’s pine areas. During August, September and October parties of Crossbill are on the move and can frequently be observed passing over head any habitat, but learning their contact/social calls in vital to their ID. Glebelands, South Haven and Ballard are best sites for hearing and seeing Crossbill on migration.


Cuckoo

Latin Name

Cuculus canorus

Status

Summer Visitor

Site And Records Information

Normally arrive mid to late April. The heathlands around the south and west of the harbour are good sites such as Coombe Heath (Arne), Middlebere, Stoborough Heath, Hartland Moor and Godlingston Heath. They can be heard through the day and night, especially moonlit nights until around late June and the adults are still around until mid July although harder to spot once they stop calling. The large number of nesting Reed Warblers would suggest that the harbour is a good breeding area however records of juveniles only occur once or twice a year.


Curlew

Latin Name

Numenius arquata

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

Common throughout the harbour, especially during the winter. Large gatherings of up to 300 birds can be seen from the RSPB hide at Shipstal. Harbour maximums can reach up to 2000 with an almost equal spread throughout the southern and western bays. There has been proved breeding on Upton Heath in 1981 and 82 and they have been heard singing on Hartland Moor in breeding season too. Ringing recoveries show most of our wintering birds are from either, Sweden, Finland, Germany or the Netherlands. On a low tide during the winter Curlew can be found on almost any exposed mud around the harbour with Holes Bay, Brands Bay, Middlebere and Upton CP offering good views.


Curlew Sandpiper

Latin Name

Calidris ferruginea

Status

Passage Migrant

Site And Records Information

Most reliably seen on Brownsea lagoon and Lytchett Fields in September when small numbers of juveniles move through. The harbour maximum is 75 on Brownsea on 31st August 1969, and 60 there on 4th Sept 1986. Large flocks have also been seen on Baiter with a notable count of 47 on 12th-15th Sept 1993. Numbers like this are very rare nowadays but always worth keeping a eye out for small groups. In recent years (since 2013) the newly created wet fields at Lytchett Bay have become a regular site for this species each autumn and with the new visitor infrastructure at RSPB Lytchett Fields, views of this species have become a lot easier.


Dark-bellied Brent Goose

Latin Name

Branta bernicla

Status

Passage Migrant & Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

Poole Harbour is Nationally important for this species, which arrive in October, feeding all around the harbour. They sometimes linger into the spring and during 2001, 2002, 2016 and 2017 (presumably sick) birds spent the summer in the harbour. Some idea of the numbers of Brent Geese that used to visit the harbour is conveyed by entries in Colonel Hawkers diary “the geese were in tens of thousands” in 1814 and “immense numbers” in 1823. Payne Gallwey, writing in 1890, commented on the rows of gunning punts on the beach and described Poole Harbour as being “one of the best grounds for wildfowl in the kingdom”. The birds started to disappear from the 1930’s and while the decline through parasitic micro organisms of the eel grass Zostera marina, their favourite food, may well have been a factor, hunting was probably to blame. By 1962 Alan Bromby, of Brownsea Island, wrote in Birds of Dorset that he was only counting “up to four in the harbour during January and ten there on 27th December.” By 1967 Dixon commented that “ the Brent Goose that was once common now only arrives in two’s and three’s as an occasional vagrant.

Then as conservation bodies increased their control and shooting declined numbers started to rise again. By 1974 Tony Wise said, “the winter flock had reached 250 birds. In 1983 numbers had reached 550- 1,000 birds and between 1,300-1,700 birds during the 1990s. Enteromorpha and Ulva are the most important food sources

Now the best place to see the largest flocks are at Middlebere, Newton Bay and Baiter. Smaller flocks are at Evening Hill (where the last of the harbours zostera still grows), Studland Bay where some of the earliest returning migrants occur, and Brands Bay . The harbour maximum is of 2442 in January 2018. Birds often pass Branksome as the commute to and from other local feeding areas or are migrating to or from the Arctic where they breed.


Dartford Warbler

Latin Name

Sylvia undata

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

The last national survey conducted in 2006 found that Dorset had more Dartford’s than any other county with 754 pairs. Key Poole Harbour sites were Studland and Godlingston (46) and Arne (39). Despite a very cold winter in 2010/11 a survey at Arne in 2011 produced 52 pairs. Active heathland management has improved the quality of habitat for this species and thereby supports survival during harsh weather. Theoretically, all patches of heathland around the harbour should host Dartford Warbler, and many now do.


Desert Wheatear

Latin Name

Oenanthe deserti

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

Rare wheatear species are much sought after birds in the autumn. In Poole Harbour only three species have been recorded with Black-eared Wheatear, Northern Wheatear and Desert Wheatear all on the Poole Harbour list. The latter has seen just one record at Studland which isn’t surprising considering the habitat looks great for a rare wheatear.

1 from 5th to 6th Mar 1997 at Knoll Beach, Studland (S.J.Morrison et al)


Dipper

Latin Name

Cinclus cinclus

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

Formally bred in the early 1900’s, including at Wareham in 1913, this is now (along with Puffin) a highly sought after Poole Harbour bird. Possible places would be around the Frome, Piddle and Corfe Valley.

1 on 6th Mar 1997 at Corfe Castle (N.Grace)
1 on 20th Mar 2011 on The Piddle at Wareham seen during a kayaking trip (I.Alexander)


Dotterel

Latin Name

Charadrius morinellus

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

Dotterel are a much sought after bird in Dorset, let alone Poole Harbour. With only 2 records for Poole Harbour it’s hoped that the ploughed fields around Ballard and Old Harry in the autumn will cater for a passing Dotterel in the coming years.

1 on 28th May 1953 at Shell Bay, Studland
1 on 12th Feb 1961 in ‘the inner harbour’. This bird might have overwintered as the date is too early for a returning migrant?


Dunlin

Latin Name

Calidris alpina

Status

Passage Migrant & Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

The numbers of Dunlin wintering in Britain have been declining since the mid 90’s. Whereas the threshold for any one site being national importance was 5300, it is now 3500. The decrease in the UK has been matched with an increase in the Netherlands, probably as a result of climate change. This species is amber listed as a result of this decline.
Dunlin remains a common wader in the winter.
Numbers wintering in the harbour increased during the second part of the 20th century. 10 year average peak counts were 3692 in the 70’s, 4080 in the 80’s and 6403 in the 90’s. A county maxima of 8,300 at the famous Pilots Point roost occurred on 24th Nov 1991.
Peaks remained around the 6-7000 figure until 2003 when a significant decline occurred. Other than 2005 when the peak was 7026, no other year in the first decade of the 21st century exceeded a peak count of 4120. Overall this produced an average peak for the decade of 4087.
Not only was the peak decreasing but the arrival dates in autumn were getting later and the departure dates earlier.
Since 2010 numbers the decline has continued and average peak WEBS counts to 2013-14 being 2424. The decline is such that the harbour is no longer recognised as being nationally important for this species.
The location of roosts has also now changed. The Studland roost ceased being significant around the end of 20th century, this is largely thought to be due to increased recreational use of the beach. Brownsea Lagoon, Arne, various yacht club mariner walls and more recently Lytchett Fields are proving more popular.
Numbers during migration rarely exceed ‘low hundreds’ in the whole harbour on any one date.


Dunnock

Latin Name

Prunella modularis

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

An abundant species throughout the harbour found in any woodland, garden, scrub, coastal, heathland habitat. Probably some passage during the autumn with migrants having been logged at Ballard and South Haven in the past.


Egyptian Goose

Latin Name

Alopochen aegyptiaca

Status

Scarce Feral Visitor

Site And Records Information

This increasing feral wanderer could potentially turn up at any wetland site, but wet areas such as Lytchett Bay, Middlebere, the Frome and Piddle Valley and Swineham all hold recent records. Could become more regular with 120 in the Avon Valley in winter 2018. It’s not clear if all birds reaching Poole Harbour are local escapes or wanderers from feral breeding populations, but some look rather suspect in their origins with white heads and ‘farmyard’ appearances. Early records consisted of 1 at Wareham on 16th April 1982. 1 on Brownsea on 23rd July 1993 which was also seen in Poole Park. 1 was found at Swineham on 16th December 2002 and was still present the next day. Since 2015 records have become far more regular with a semi-resident pair hanging around Holme Lane/Swineham and Sunnyside.

 


Eider

Latin Name

Somateria mollissima

Status

Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

Eider used to be present most winters in Poole Harbour but over the last decade has seen a considerable drop in records with the current 5-year winter average being only 1 per winter!

A flock of 20 summered at Pilots Point in 1983 and they were not recorded much before 1950, as A J Bull wrote in the 1961 Bird Report “42 were counted on Hook Sands in Poole Bay on December 31st by Helen Brotherton. It is worth noting that the Eider was still considered a “rare vagrant” in Dorset in 1946” . Though it has been seen with increasing frequency during the last decade these figures exceed previous totals. The harbour maximum is 135 in February 1989 and 10 summered in Poole Harbour from June-Sept 1969, and 20 in Studland Bay during the summer of 1976, also 19 in Studland Bay June-Aug 1996.

The 10 year average peak counts 1950 – 2010 are as follows. 1950’s – 7, 1960’s – 22, 1970’s – 28, 1980’s – 39, 1990’s – 14, 2000’s – 8 (However this figure would be half this were it not for the large flock which gathered in the winter of 2002-03. Since then peak counts have been 2010 – 14, 2011 – 6 and 2012 – 2.

When Eider do arrive for the winter Studland Bay, Shell Bay, South Deep, Jerry’s Point, Central Harbour and Brands Bay are all the most suitable sites to look.


Elegant Tern

Latin Name

Thalasseus elegans

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

A colour-ringed individual which had originally been ringed in France, with DNA analysis also being carried out confirming the bird was indeed 100% Elegant Tern, and hadn’t hybridised with Sandwich Tern.

1 Adult on Brownsea Lagoon 21st June 2017 (H.Murry et al)


Feral Pigeon

Latin Name

Columba livia

Status

Resident

Site And Records Information

Common in and around the urban areas in the north of the harbour. Poole Quay, Poole High Street and Poole Park. Surprisingly rare on the southern shores.


Ferruginous Duck

Latin Name

Aythya nyroca

Status

Vagrant

Site And Records Information

This small and rare duck from central and south-eastern Europe is now a regular feature on UK water bodies. With a reintroduction program in Germany too it’s likely we’ll begin seeing more records of ‘Fudge Duck’ over the coming years. To date there have been five Poole Harbour records.

1 female on the 24th Aug 1977 at Middlebere
1 female on 8th Jan 1979 at Poole Park
1 female on 21st Apr 1981 at Little Sea, Studland
1 adult male on 4th – 6th Jan 2003 at Little Sea, Studland (G. Walbridge et al). This bird was a regular feature at Morden Park Lake in winter from 1997. It had first been seen there in 1994. This was its first and only foray in to Poole Harbour.
1 male on 13th Oct 2006 at Little Sea, Studland (G. Armstrong, I. Prophet).


Fieldfare

Latin Name

Turdus pilaris

Status

Passage Migrant & Winter Visitor

Site And Records Information

Fieldfare begin to arrive in mid-October, increasing in numbers into November. The favoured sites are Soldiers Road, Middlebere, Upton Country Park, Arne, Bestwall, in fact anywhere with large fields and berry bushes for them to feed in. Cold weather movements can occur with counts of 20,000+ birds being reported flying over the harbour in a single day. Any records after March are unusual.


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